Staraya Derevnya

  • This station in Internet: Wikipedia, Wikimapia
  • Opened: January 14, 1999
  • Station depth: 61 meters
  • Project title: Sestroretskaya
  • Popular names: Starukha (the old woman)
  • Type of station: single-vaulted
  • Entrance to the station: separate ground lobby
  • Traffic: about 1.16 million people per month

A typical "single-vaulted" station, for some reason visually very similar to the station Obukhovo. The main feature is the twilight of this station, because the project lighting is completely insufficient, even when all the lights are on.

The station has its own revolving dead end, before the construction Komendantsky Prospekt was the terminal. The reverse dead end for part of the routes is still used today.

The name of the station on the track walls is decorated with a cute rose. The name itself ("old village") is due to the historical name of the area where the station is located. Settlements appeared here simultaneously with the foundation of St. Petersburg, and the Old village began to be called in 1747 in contrast to the New Village, built a little later closer to the city center.

The doors on the track walls are unadorned, simple. And in general, there are few decorations under the ground here.

A mosaic is traditionally located at the end of the hall for "one-liners", but in the twilight of this particular station it is very poorly visible. An unsuccessful option.

The lamps are stylized as street lamps. Please note that the same elements are used in the lamp of the lobby upstairs, where we will soon go up.

Escalators are traditionally located at the end of the hall. The hermetic door is vertical, of the "guillotine" type.

Let's go upstairs.

At the top, the escalator hall is decorated with a wonderful round lamp. The same elements as on the lamps below.

The escalator hall is separated from the lobby by another hermetic door, apparently - lifting vertically from below. Which suggests the high security of the escalator hall.

From the outside, the lobby building is quite delicate. But it is badly damaged by the shopping pavilions that appeared here almost immediately after the station opened. It was not for nothing that Christ drove the merchants out of churches and metro stations.

It is interesting that once it was here that the Children's Railway track, also known as the Northern Route of the Malaya Oktyabrskaya Railway, ended.

Let's go back down.

And let's move on. In general, single-vaulted stations are not very rich in terms of design, although they are better than "horizontal elevators".